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Remembering CAPT Bob Batterson (USN Retired)

Take a listen our interview with the late CAPT Batterson by clicking HERE.

Take a listen our interview with the late CAPT Batterson by clicking HERE.


Captain Robert E. "Bob" Batterson was a man of honor, courage, and unwavering dedication. Born in the rolling hills of West Virginia, his journey through life would take him from the coal mines of his hometown to the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean, and later, into the service of the Church.


In the late summer of 1939, as war clouds gathered over Europe, a young and determined Bob enlisted in the United States Navy. His commitment to serving his country was unwavering, and he would go on to prove his mettle time and time again. Bob's thirst for knowledge and his drive to excel were evident from the very beginning. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Ohio State University and further honed his skills with a Master's Degree from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. These achievements were just the start of a remarkable career that spanned decades.



Take a listen our interview with the late CAPT Batterson by clicking HERE.


His first assignment took him to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, where he underwent recruit training. But fate had grander plans for him. Soon, he found himself stationed aboard the USS Philadelphia, CL-41, as part of the Pacific Fleet. It was here, in the vast blue waters of the Pacific, that Bob would come to understand the profound significance of his service.

Eight months before the infamous December 7th attack on Pearl Harbor, Bob was transferred to Naval Station Pearl Harbor. He would witness the horrors of that day and the United States' entry into World War II. But rather than deter him, the attack steeled his resolve to do all he could to protect his country.


When the opportunity arose for enlisted personnel to apply for flight training, Bob seized it. His determination soared as high as the aircraft he would come to master. In September 1944, he earned his wings as a Naval Aviator, becoming a guardian of the skies. After completing fighter training in the formidable F6F Hellcat at Daytona Beach, Bob was assigned to Fighter Squadron ONE aboard the USS Bennington, CV-20. He served with distinction until the end of the war, earning respect and accolades from his fellow servicemen.


Bob's commitment to service didn't end with the war's conclusion. He transitioned to the Supply Corps and continued to serve his country in various capacities until his well-deserved retirement in 1974. His military career was marked by unwavering dedication, integrity, and a deep love for his nation.


Take a listen our interview with the late CAPT Batterson by clicking HERE.


In retirement, Bob found another calling, one of spiritual significance. He dedicated a decade of his life to serving the Diocese of Corpus Christi as the Fiscal Officer under Bishops Drury and Gracida. His tireless work earned him the Papal Medal Pro-Ecclesia Et Pontifice in 1984, a testament to his devoted service to the Church. But Bob's heart was not just in the church; it was also on the sea. For over three decades, he volunteered on the USS Lexington Museum, where he was one of the original volunteers. His passion for naval history and his love for the museum's mission were evident in his commitment to preserving the legacy of those who served.


On Friday, August 11th, 2023, Captain Robert E. "Bob" Batterson passed away, leaving behind a legacy of service, sacrifice, and unwavering devotion. His memory lives on in the hearts of those he served, both in the Navy and in the Church. Bob's journey from the coal mines of West Virginia to the skies of World War II and the halls of the Church is a testament to the extraordinary impact one person can have when they dedicate their life to the service of others. He will forever be remembered as a true American hero and a man of deep faith.


Take a listen our interview with the late CAPT Batterson by clicking HERE.




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