US Air Force Museum Announces 4th Annual Student Writing Competition

WARBIRD RADIO – Attention students…the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will hold its fourth annual Air Force Heritage and History Writing Competition, providing students the opportunity to develop positive academic and character qualities and to showcase their writing talents while vying for scholarship funds.  According to a recent news release, the competition is open to public, private school or homeschooled students between the ages of 13-18. Entries must be submitted via U.S. mail or email by Feb. 17, 2014. The competition will accept only the first 250 entrants. The requirements for this writing competition meet Common Core curriculum English Language Arts writing standards for grades 6-12.

The research questions for this year’s competition are as follows: July 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I (WWI). How did the participation of American pilots in WWI assist in the creation of a U.S. Air Corps and eventually the U.S. Air Force? Who were two significant U.S. pilots of this period? Use research evidence to support your argument. A complete list of competition guidelines is available on the museum’s website via the Quick Link posted below.

Scholarship award money is provided by the Air Force Museum Foundation, Inc. A $1,500 scholarship will be awarded to the first place winner, $1,000 to the second place winner and $500 to the third place winner. Last year’s winners were surprised as an additional $1,000 in scholarship funds were provided due to the generous support of the Foundation. Local educators will determine the finalists, and those submissions will be sent on to national-level judges to decide on the three winners.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located on Springfield Street, six miles northeast of downtown Dayton. It is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day). Admission and parking are free.

QUICK LINK:  Writing Competition

Doolittle Raider’s Final Toast To Take Place This November

Doolittle Tokyo Raiders ToastWARBIRD RADIO –  The National Museum of the United States Air Force along with the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders announced this morning that the U.S. Air Force will host the famed Doolittle Tokyo Raiders’ final toast to their fallen comrades during an invitation-only ceremony on Nov. 9 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

On April 18, 1942, 80 men achieved the unimaginable when they took off from an aircraft carrier on a top secret mission to bomb Japan. Led by Lt. Col. James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle, these men came to be known as the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders. Today, just four of the men survive: Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole, co-pilot of Crew No. 1; Lt. Col. Robert L. Hite, co-pilot of Crew No. 16; Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor, engineer-gunner of Crew No. 15; and Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher, engineer-gunner of Crew No. 7. At this time, all four Raiders are planning to attend the event. According to Museum Director Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Jack Hudson, the Doolittle Raid was an extremely important event in the development of American air power because it marked the first combat use of strategic bombardment by the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II.

“While the attack itself caused little actual damage to Japanese war industry, the psychological impact on the Japanese military and the American public proved to be immense,” said Hudson. “The U.S. Air Force has drawn upon the Doolittle Raiders for inspiration ever since, and we are deeply honored that they have chosen to have this final ceremony at our national museum.”

In 1959 the city of Tucson, Ariz., presented the Doolittle Raiders with a set of silver goblets, each bearing the name of one of the 80 men who flew on the mission. At each of their past reunions, the surviving Raiders would conduct their solemn “Goblet Ceremony.” After toasting the Raiders who died since their last meeting, they would then turn the deceased men’s goblets upside down. The Nov. 9 event will mark their final toast.

Among those scheduled to attend the ceremony to pay tribute to the Raiders are Air Force Acting Secretary Eric Fanning and Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh III.  The public will also have an opportunity to celebrate these World War II aviation heroes that day through events that include a wreath-laying ceremony at the Doolittle Raiders memorial and a flyover of B-25 aircraft. In addition, the Air Force Museum Theatre is planning to show Doolittle Raider and World War II-themed films. More details will be announced as the event nears.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force, located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, is the service’s national institution for preserving and presenting the Air Force story. Each year, more than one million visitors come to the museum to learn about the mission, history and evolving capabilities of America’s Air Force.

QUICK LINK:  Raider’s Final Toast 

USAF Museum Presents Adrian Cronauer

Adrian Cronauer's Story - Courtesy of The National Museum of the USAF

WARBIRD RADIO – Join us for a special presentation courtesy of the National Museum of The United States Air Force.  Adrian Cronauer is a legend in the world of radio.  Most notably as the inspiration behind Robin Williams character in Good Morning, Vietnam.  Here Mr. Cronauer’s story…and what he’s doing today.  Enjoy!

QUICK LINK:  The National Museum of The United States Air Force

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