Mossie Pilot Mike Spalding &The Aviation Historian – Warbird Radio LIVE! – Episode 503

MikeNMossie1WARBIRD RADIO – On this episode of Warbird Radio LIVE Matt Jolley catches up with Mosquito pilot Mike Spalding and Mick Oakey from The Aviation Historian.  With all the buzz around the Military Aviation Museum’s deHavilland Mosquito has been making we thought it would be fun to hear ( first hand ) from the pilot of the wooden wonder.

Mike goes into airspeeds, maneuvering and of course what she’s like on landing and takeoff.

Mick Oakey (Managing Editor of The Aviation Historian) is no stranger to warbirds or journalism.  For over 20 years Mick was the Editor at Aeroplane and has now struck out with Nick Stroud to create the new “gold standard” for all aviation journals:  The Aviation Historian.  Each edition is chock full of stories, pictures and first hand accounts of aviation’s treasured past.  This is not your typical “airplane magazine” it’s truly worthy of a leather binder and spot on your favorite shelf for safe keeping.

Thanks for tuning in and we hope you enjoy the show!  Feel free to post your comments below.

QUICK LINK:  The Aviation Historian

QUICK LINK:  The Military Aviation Museum

World’s Only Flying deHavilland Mosquito Takes Flight In USA! (Video & Photos)

MossieKEYIMAGEWARBIRD RADIO – Earlier this week the Military Aviation Museum’s deHavilland Mosquito took flight near Virginia Beach, Virginia.  We started covering this particular airplane’s journey to flight over three years ago.  Our original interview with restorer Glyn Powell will be rebroadcast later this month.  Additionally, WRL listener and friend Jon Brawner (Fighter Factory Team Member) reports the first flight had no squaks and went great.  Our congratulations to the team at Fighter Factory and all who were involved on this incredible project.

Here’s a brief background on the airplane according to the Military Aviation Museum’s website:

The de Havilland DH-98 Mosquito, constructed almost entirely of wood, is affectionately known as “The Wooden Wonder”. This particular airplane, number KA114, was manufactured in Canada in 1945 but never saw combat action in the Second World War. In tribute to the New Zealanders responsible for the restoration, 487 Squadron RNZAF color scheme was chosen and it was painted as EG-Y.

After being sold surplus to a farmer in Alberta, Canada in 1948, it deteriorated in a farm field until 1978 when it was acquired by a Canadian museum. The Military Aviation Museum purchased the crumbling remains in 2004 and shipped it to AVspecs in New Zealand for restoration. A major obstacle was recreating the forms needed for the new wooden fuselage, wings, and tail sections. Glyn Powell, of Auckland, had spent nearly a decade building the 36 foot long molds for the fuselage alone.

Developed as a high speed fighter with a two man crew, this twin-engine aircraft is powered by dual original Rolls Royce Merlin engines and equipped with four replica machine guns and 20mm canons under the nose. The Mossie was prized for its maneuverability and speed capability of over 350 mph.

Eight years of painstaking restoration work resulted in the long awaited first flight at Ardmore Airport in September of this year. Of approximately 30 projects and museum displays that remain, our Mossie is the only flying Mosquito in the world today.

Country: Canada

Manufacturer: de Havilland

Engine: 2 x Packard Merlin 225

Horsepower: 1,620 hp

Max Speed: 366 mph

Empty Weight: 13356 lbs

Max Weight: 18649 lbs

Wing Span: 54 ft 2 in

Ceiling: 29,000 feet

Crew: Two

PHOTO TOUR (Images Courtesy of Jon Brawner):

 

VIDEO (Courtesy of Jon Brawner):  Click here ( Video )

QUICK LINK:  Military Aviation Museum

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