Boeing F-18 Test Pilot John Tougas – Wabird Radio LIVE! – Episode 634

WARBIRD RADIO –  Boeing F-18 Experiment Test Pilot John Tougas, joins Matt Jolley on this episode of Warbird Radio LIVE!  John Tougas is an Experimental Test Pilot based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. He supports all aspects of the technology development, acceptance and demonstration flight operations for the F/A-18 Super Hornet, EA-18G Growler and P-8A Poseidon aircraft.

According to his official biography, Tougas was the lead test pilot for the Advanced Super Hornet technology demonstrator, conducted autonomous landing flight tests on the QF-16 drone during initial testing and flew air refueling flight tests in the TA-4J Skyhawk for the 767 Italian Tanker program. Tougas joined Boeing in 2009 after a 20-year career in the U.S. Navy. He entered the Navy through an ROTC scholarship earning Bachelors in aerospace engineering from Georgia Tech in 1988.

He received his Navy wings of gold in 1990 and returned Georgia Tech where he earned a Master’s degree in aerospace engineering in 1991. In 1992, Tougas completed initial F-18 Hornet training as the top graduate in his class and joined his first Fleet squadron, VFA-195 Dambusters home ported in Japan. During this tour Tougas made numerous deployments to the Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf flying combat missions in the F/A-18C Hornet off the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) in support of Operation Southern Watch. In 1996, Tougas was assigned to Naval Air Station China Lake, California, as an operational test pilot with VX-9 where he led several F/A-18C project upgrades. In 1997, Tougas graduated from the United States Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS) in Patuxent River, returning to China Lake as a developmental test pilot in the F-18 Hornet and Super Hornet.

In 2000, Tougas returned to the Fleet for his Department Head tour where he completed numerous deployments throughout the Western Pacific embarked aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) including supporting Operations Noble Eagle following the September 11th terrorist attacks. In 2002, Tougas was assigned as the Officer in Charge of a Navy detachment to the Air Force Flight Test Center’s Nellis detachment. During this tour was the Chief Test Pilot of a classified prototype air vehicle and flew multiple types including F-18 and F-16 fighters.

In 2003 he was inducted into the Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP) where he served on the Membership Committee for 2 years. In 2005, Tougas returned to Japan for a third Fleet tour as the Carrier Air Group (CAG) Operations Officer. During this tour he orchestrated several multi-national exercises and managed the training and readiness resources for nine Fleet squadrons over six deployments aboard the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to multiple locations in the Western Pacific while maintaining combat currency in the F/A-18 Super Hornet. Tougas’ last assignment in the Navy was serving as the Executive Officer for the VX-23 Salty Dogs at NAS Patuxent River, Md., where he flew many tests on F/A-18 projects and served in SETP as the East Coast Section Chairman. He retired from the Navy on March 2009, with the rank of Commander. His flying experience includes more than 4300 hours of flight time in more than 30 different types of aircraft. He has logged more than 3,000 F/A-18 hours including over 600 carrier arrested landings on eight aircraft carriers.

Tougas is a graduate of the Air Command and Staff College and the Naval Aviation Safety Officer School. His awards include Meritorious Service Medal, Aerial Achievement Medal, two Navy and one Air Force Commendation Medals, one Navy and one Air Force Achievement Medal. He is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Maryland Civil Air Patrol and serves on the SETP Board of Directors as the Secretary.

Matt also welcomes Jason Capra from Vintage Wings Inc. with an update on their C-53 “Beach City Baby”.

This marks the first time a current fighter aircraft test pilot has come on WRL

LIVE BROADCAST begins 8pm ET / 11-28-17 / Podcast will follow

QUICK LINK:  Boeing F-18 Program

QUICK LINK:  Beach City Baby’s Website

STUDIO LINE:  478-397-5157

SKYPE: warbirdradio

 

Boeing, Lockheed Martin Team for US Air Force Bomber Program

WARBIRD RADIO – The Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation are teaming to compete for the United States Air Force’s Long-Range Strike Bomber program, with Boeing acting as the prime contractor and Lockheed Martin as the primary teammate.

According to a recent news release, to this critical mission, the team brings together nearly two centuries of combined experience designing, developing and testing aircraft for defense customers around the world. The companies also bring expertise in integrating proven technologies, and their skilled workforces and critical infrastructure and scale, to meet the U.S. Air Force’s cost and schedule requirements.

“Boeing and Lockheed Martin are bringing together the best of the two enterprises, and the rest of industry, in support of the Long-Range Strike Bomber program, and we are honored to support our U.S. Air Force customer and this important national priority,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing Defense, Space & Security. “Stable planning, along with efficient and affordable development and production approaches, enables our team to reduce development risk by leveraging mature technologies and integrating existing systems.”

Separately the companies are developing two of the Air Force’s top priorities, the KC-46 tanker and F-35 Lightning II, respectively, and they partnered on the F-22 Raptor stealth fighter. Each has delivered key Air Force capabilities including the B-1B bomber, F-15E strike fighter, and F-117 and F-16 fighters. The team will be able to produce unique and affordable solutions that could not be achieved without partnering.

“Building on decades of manned and unmanned weapon systems experience, we’re proud to bring our collection of technologies, capabilities and resources to affordably design, develop, produce and sustain the bomber program,” said Orlando Carvalho, Executive Vice President of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. “We’re confident that our team will meet the well-defined system requirements and deliver a world-class next generation Long-Range Strike Bomber to the U.S. Air Force within the budget and timeframe required.”

A unit of The Boeing Company, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is one of the world’s largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world’s largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is a $33 billion business with 58,000 employees worldwide.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 116,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.

Boeing Takes Major Step Towards Human Space Flight In United States

LOWBAY-SMFA-300dpi_medWARBIRD RADIO – Boeing has finalized an agreement with Space Florida to use a processing facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to build the Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100 spacecraft, an important step toward restoring the United States’ ability to launch humans into space.

According to a recent news release, “the resources and expertise on the Space Coast are essential to our plans and this agreement solidifies our partnership with the state of Florida,” said John Mulholland, Boeing vice president and program manager, Commercial Programs. “Boeing is committed to providing the most innovative, safest and cost-effective commercial space transportation system to NASA and other commercial customers, and adding the capabilities of the processing facility to our portfolio plays a big part in our plans.”

Renamed the Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility (C3PF), the former space shuttle hangar known as Orbiter Processing Facility-3 is being modernized by Space Florida to meet requirements for building the CST-100 capsule.

“Boeing and Space Florida continue our partnership in repurposing excess NASA facilities for future use by Boeing’s Commercial Crew Program,” said Frank Dibello, president and CEO, Space Florida. “With phase one complete, we look forward to finishing the next phase of facility modification.”

Space Florida is the state’s independent agency for aerospace development. Phase one of the C3PF renovation was completed in February; phase two began in September with improvements including technology upgrades to the environmental and electrical systems and reflooring the facility. Boeing expects to move into C3PF in spring 2014.

Boeing’s Commercial Crew Program is on track for an expected 2016 test launch time frame, with work continuing in Houston, Huntington Beach, Calif., and Florida. In partnership with NASA, Boeing is continuing to develop the CST-100 with the successful completion of water-recovery tests. The company recently unveiled the full-scale CST-100 mock-up to the world in Houston.

Boeing’s CST-100 spacecraft will shuttle astronauts to low-Earth-orbit locations such as the International Space Station and expandable space habitats being developed by Bigelow Aerospace. The CST-100 is designed to accommodate up to six crew members or a mix of crew and cargo.

Visit the Quick Link below for more information about the future of human space exploration.

QUICK LINK:  Beyond Earth

Boeing Delivers Last C-17 Globemaster III To USAF

FinalC-17WARBIRD RADIO – According to new release earlier today, Boeing delivered the 223rd and last U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III airlifter today, fulfilling the production contract more than 20 years after the first delivery.  The aircraft left Boeing’s Long Beach facility to fly to its assignment at Joint Base Charleston, S.C., where a ceremony will mark its arrival.

The Air Force was the C-17’s launch customer. Since the aircraft’s first flight Sept. 15, 1991, it has been the world’s only strategic airlifter with tactical capabilities that allow it to fly between continents, land on short, austere runways, and airdrop supplies precisely where they are needed.

“Thank you for delivering to our nation combat airlift – that is the definition of the C-17 – the most versatile, most capable, most ready airlifter ever built,” said U.S. Air Force Gen. Paul Selva, commander, Air Mobility Command. “What you have done with this aircraft speaks volumes about your character.”

Boeing continues to produce C-17s for other customers around the world, and maintain and sustain the aircraft through the C-17 Globemaster Integrated Sustainment Program.

C-17s have been involved in contingency operations of all types, including flying troops and equipment to Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and to Operation Iraqi Freedom. The airlifter also has been used in humanitarian missions around the world, including the Japanese and Indian Ocean tsunamis of 2011 and 2004, respectively; Hurricane Katrina in 2005; and the Haitian earthquake of 2010.

“C-17s are the workhorse for the U.S. Air Force in wartime and in peace,” said Chris Chadwick, Boeing Military Aircraft president. “So while this is the last new C-17 to be added to the Air Force fleet, the mission does not stop here. The C-17 delivers hope and saves lives, and with the Air Force in the pilot’s seat, it will continue to do so well into the future.”

The C-17 holds 33 world records – more than any other airlifter in history – including payload-to-altitude, time-to-climb and short-takeoff-and-landing marks. It has exceeded 2.6 million flight hours, playing an integral role in global strategic airlift.

The National Aeronautics Association in 1994 awarded the C-17 its Collier Trophy, recognizing the aircraft as the top aeronautical achievement of that year.

“C-17 is the product of our dedicated workforce and more than 20 years of teamwork with our suppliers and the U.S. Air Force,” said Nan Bouchard, Boeing vice president and C-17 program manager. “Every employee here is proud to build this amazing aircraft. We are continuing the legacy by building C-17s for our partner nations, and we will continue to work with the U.S. Air Force to ensure their aircraft deliver top performance into the future.”

In addition to the 223 C-17s delivered to the U.S. Air Force, 34 are operated by Australia, Canada, India, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of NATO and Partnership for Peace nations.

Boeing Continues Improving US Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II

080219-F-2605S-014WARBIRD RADIO – According to a recent news release Boeing will continue improving U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II mission readiness, and decreasing maintenance costs, through a follow-on order for 56 replacement wings for that aircraft.   Boeing is on contract to build up to 242 wings, including these, at its plant in Macon, Ga. Refitting the fleet with new wings will improve the mission availability of A-10s by an estimated 4 percent and will help save the Air Force an estimated $1.3 billion in maintenance costs during the next 30 years.

This latest order is valued at $212 million. Including this agreement, the Air Force has ordered 173 wings. The efforts of Boeing, its suppliers, and the Air Force will allow the A-10 fleet to operate into 2035.

The A-10 is a twin-engine jet designed for close air support of ground forces. It can be used against all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles.

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